A “Special” Treat for Your Valentines Sweetheart

February 14, 2017

Looking for something different to do for your sweetheart for Valentine’s Day this year? Sexual problems (sexual dysfunctions) are common among both women and men with diabetes as a result of complications from the disease.  This year as a gift to your partner and to yourself, be courageous and learn about this personal issue and talk to your healthcare provider about what options are available.  Remember, it’s normal to feel embarrassed discussing intimacy, but your doctor is a professional who is there to help you, not judge you.  This is a medical problem – not a personal failure.  Here is a little background information to get your started.

Good sex requires the right circumstances so you both feel excited and safe. Feeling “aroused” requires good nerve conduction, blood flow, and the right balance of hormones.  Fluctuation in hormone and blood glucose levels, depression, and nerve damage all contribute to sexual dysfunction.  The American Diabetes Association provides a three-step approach to help alleviate fears associated with diabetes and sexual dysfunction:

  1. Start with yourself – You can lower the risk for sexual dysfunction or alleviate the condition if you already have it. Monitor blood glucose levels. Get plenty of rest. Enjoy a healthy meal plan. Incorporate physical activity throughout your day.
  2. Communicate with your partner – Communication can reduce anxiety associated with sexual dysfunction. Set time aside for honest discussion. Listen carefully.
  3. Work with your physician – Make regular visits and set personal goals. Write down questions ahead of time, and research some options before you visit. Ask about counseling or medicines or procedures that can help.

Diabetes in men can cause nerve and artery damage in the genital area, disrupting the blood flow necessary for an erection. Some men may experience an ejaculation which goes backward into the bladder which can make it difficult to father a child.  Over a long period of time high blood sugar levels can lead to low testosterone and may contribute to decreased sexual interest.

Diabetes in women can result in nerve damage that causes vaginal dryness making intercourse uncomfortable. Nerve damage can also lead to loss of sensation in the genital area.  Urinary infections (yeast infections) are also more common in people with diabetes, making intercourse uncomfortable.

There is a range of treatments, and any therapy will be more successful if both you and your partner are involved in the process.  Keep your sexual play interesting.  Something new may restore some freshness and improve both interest and function.  Make sure you are having fun.  Take time to connect with your partner.  Have a date night, and take time to have a relationship with each other on purpose.  Redefine sex, take your time.  You may find it helpful to meet with a mental health professional (such as a therapist) who can help you learn how to reduce stress and change behaviors and attitudes associated with impotence and lack of sexual desire.  Other Impotence treatments for men include oral medications (Viagra, Cialis, Levitra); mechanical methods (vacuum pumps and constriction rings); and surgical methods like penile implants.

Sexual issues don’t just impact you; they affect your personal relationships and create challenges of trust, intimacy, and closeness. Your partner may wonder if you are losing interest, or if you don’t want to spend time with them.  Understanding how your sexual health can be affected by diabetes can help you manage this important life issue successfully.

 

 

 

Resources: American Diabetes Association; Harvard medical School Patient Education Center; American Association of Diabetes Educators; Joslin Diabetes Center

 

 


Diabetes Support Program Presents:

February 7, 2017

Diabetes, Apps, and Websites – Oh My!

10:00 a.m.  Thursday, February 16, 2017

Hyland Education Great Room

10020 Kennerly Road

St. Louis, MO 63128

 

Presented by:

Alison Brinker, RD, LD, CDE

Susan Klick, MSN, RN CNL

Meetings are FREE to the public.

All are welcome!

 To register, call 314-ANTHONY (268-4669)

or visit stanthonysmedcenter.com/diabetes.

Come and join us for a fun and learn about the latest mobile phone apps and websites designed to help manage your diabetes better.

 


Can You Hear Me Now?

January 17, 2017

According to the American Diabetes Association, it appears there is an overlap between diabetes and hearing loss. A recent study found that hearing loss is twice as common in people with diabetes as it is in those who don’t have the disease.

Hmmmm. Why could this be?  We know that high blood glucose levels cause damage to small blood vessels (for example, in the kidneys and eyes).  It is possible then that the same damage may be occurring in the ears.  Over time, when hearingexposed to high levels of blood glucose, the very tiny vessels in the inner ear may break.  The vessels of the cochlear (the spiral tube, shaped like a snail’s shell, that forms part of the internal ear, where sound vibrations are converted into nerve impulses) thicken, making blood flow to that part of the ear very difficult.   Other research has shown that when exposed to high blood glucose over a long period of time nerve damage can occur leading to hearing loss.

Symptoms of hearing loss can be hard to notice because hearing loss happens slowly. Many times, family or friends notice it before the person experiencing it.  Some signs of hearing loss include:  frequently asking others to repeat themselves; trouble following conversations that involve more than two people; thinking that others are mumbling; problems hearing in noisy places such as busy restaurants; trouble hearing the voices of women and small children; turning up the television or radio too loud for others who are nearby.

Do you think you may be experiencing hearing loss? If so, talk to your primary care doctor, or seek help from a specialist such as an audiologist.  A full hearing exam will not only teach you about your hearing loss, but you will be told what can be done to treat it.

 

 

Sources:
American Diabetes Association
AADE In Practice Sept 2014

Carbohydrate Counting Tips for the New Year

January 3, 2017

By Alison Brinker, RD, LD, CDE

Research shows that counting carbohydrates is important for good glucose control.   However, it can get a little tricky at times………pizza, salads, casseroles.  All those combination foods can be difficult.  Following are some tips that may help make counting your carbs a bit easier.

Hot dishes made with pasta or grains such as tuna noodle casserole or lasagna have about 30 grams of carbohydrate per cup. Using a measuring cup is most accurate, but if you can’t measure a cup is about the size of a woman’s fist.  Stews or Asian-style meals that are a mix of meat and vegetables in a savory sauce are about 15 grams of carb per cup.  Keep in mind that measuring foods at home will help you better estimate portion sizes when eating out.

Broth-based soups and cream soups made with water are about 15 grams of carb per cup. If it is a hearty soup you could eat with a fork or if it is loaded with noodles or beans estimate about 30 grams of carb for one cup.

If you are at a potluck think about the size of the serving spoon. Four level tablespoons is about ¼ cup.  This amount of baked beans, for example is about 15 grams of carbohydrate.  Baked beans are a starchy vegetable and most likely have molasses or brown sugar as an ingredient.  A larger serving spoon is about ¼ cup per scoop.  Two of these larger spoonfuls of corn or another starchy vegetable will be about a ½ cup or 15 grams of carb.

Not all salads are created equal when it comes to carbs. One cup of a leafy green salad has only 2-5 grams of carb compared to creamy coleslaw that has 15 grams carb for a ½ cup portion.  Potato salads and pasta salads often have sugar in the dressing so count those as 30 grams of carb for a ½ cup portion.

Think of pizza in terms of the crust. Thin crust is going to have much lower carb content than hand tossed or pan pizza.  1/8 of a 12 inch thin crust pizza has about 15 grams of carb.  You should add about 5-10 grams of carb per slice if you have a hand tossed crust or pan pizza.

Be careful with the items offered free to the table at some restaurants. Most rolls, bread slices and bread sticks are 15 grams of carb per serving.  Twelve tortilla chips are also about 15 grams of carb.  Even though the salsa is a free item and is very low in carbs, the chips can add up quickly.

Fruit smoothies, although they sound healthy, can have just as much carbohydrate as a can of regular soda. Some smoothies average 45 grams of carb in a 12 oz. portion which is just as much as a regular soda.  If you choose a smoothie as a quick breakfast option measure your ingredients separately as you add to the blender to ensure your carb count is accurate.

I hope you find these tips helpful. Below is a chicken chili recipe for the crockpot.  It is easy to prepare, great for a cold winter night and about 30 grams of carb for a 1 cup portion.  Carbohydrate is found in the white beans which are also a wonderful source of fiber.  Top your chili with diced avocado to add some healthy monounsaturated fat.  Enjoy!

 

Slow Cooker White Chili with Chicken

1 ½ pounds boneless, skinless chicken breast

1 Tablespoon minced garlic

1 Tablespoon ground cumin

1 teaspoon salt (optional)

1 teaspoon chili powder

½ teaspoon oregano

½ teaspoon cayenne pepper

½ pound dried Great Northern Beans

3 cups low sodium chicken broth

1 cup chopped onion

2 4-ounce cans chopped green chiles, undrained

Chopped fresh cilantro, chopped avocado, chopped tomato (optional for serving)

The evening before you plan to make the chili soak beans in a large container covered with water for at least 8 hours or overnight. Place beans along with chicken, onion, broth, chopped chiles and seasonings into the crockpot.  Stir to mix the ingredients.  Cook on high 4-6 hours or on low 8-10 hours.  Remove chicken from the crockpot and using 2 forks shred the chicken, return chicken to the crockpot and mix well.   Serve chili topped with cilantro, avocado and tomato if desired.

30 grams carbohydrate per 1 cup portion

 

Source: Diabeticlivingonline.com.  The recipe was modified using the White Chicken Chili on the Everyday Essential Great Northern Bean package and Slow Cooker White Chili with Chicken on allrecipes.com

 


12 Days of Diabetes

December 23, 2016

Here is a new twist to the traditional 12 Days of Christmas, a little something to make you smile!

On the 12th day of Christmas my Diabetes Educator gave to me:

12 Carbs a Counting

11 Injection Sites

10 Finger Pricks

9 Boxes of Lancets

8 Glucose Log Books

7 Containers of Test Strips

6 Glucose Tablets

5 Insulin Pens

4 Pen Needles

3 Ketone Strips

2 Healthy Feet

and Props for a Great A1C

Wishing you a very Merry Christmas and a Healthy New Year

Your Diabetes Care Team

Alison, Darla, Kristen, Liz, and Sue


Holiday Table – Green Beans with Tomato Basil Walnut Salsa

December 13, 2016

Enjoy this delicious vegetable side dish as part of your holiday meal. 

Ingredients:

2 ¼ pound                Green Beans, fresh

2/3 tbsp.                   Olive or canola oil

2 tbsp.                       Garlic Cloves, peeled, fresh, minced

½ Cup                       Basil, Fresh, Chopped

2 tbsp.                       Shallots, peeled, fresh, minced

12 ounce                  Tomatoes, fresh, peeled, diced

4 tbsp.                       Olives, Kalamata, pitted, chopped

1 tbsp.                       Walnuts, chopped

4 tbsp.                       Red wine vinegar

 

Preparation:

 

  1. Blanch green beans in boiling water, drain, chill and drain. Place on a platter.
  2. Heat oil in a skillet and cook garlic until toasted to a golden brown.
  3. Place toasted garlic in a bowl. Add basil, shallots, diced tomatoes, finely minced olives, finely minced toasted walnuts and red wine vinegar. Mix together.
  4. Arrange garlic mixture over green beans.  

Nutrition Information per 1 cup serving: 55 calories, 2 g total fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 47 mg sodium, 9 g carbohydrate (3 g fiber, 4 g sugars), 2 g protein

green-beans

 

 

Resource:   2011  Morrison Management Specialists, Inc

December Recipe of the Month – Calling All Deer Hunters

December 6, 2016

Marinated Venison Steak with Mushrooms

Ingredients:

  • 1 ½ pounds venison steak, trimmed of fat
  • 1 garlic clove, crushed
  • ½ teaspoon oregano
  • 1 cup fat-free Italian salad dressing
  • Black pepper
  • 1 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
  • Nonstick cooking spray

Directions:

The night before cooking, place steak in a gallon-size resealable plastic bag. Add crushed garlic clove, oregano, and salad dressing.  Shake well and refrigerate overnight.

Remove steak from bag and discard the marinade. Grill the steak indoors or outdoors, seasoning with black pepper to taste and turning once.  (For medium steak, internal temperature should be about 165 degrees  F. )

Top venison with mushrooms and serve.

Yield: 16 ounces cooked meat.  Serving size:  4 ounces or ¼ recipe.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving: Calories:  141, Carbohydrates:  5g, protein:  26g, Fat:  3 g, Saturated Fat:  1g, Cholesterol:  96 mg, Sodium 250 mg, Fiber:  2g

 

 

 

Source: Diabetes Self Management 2016

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