December Recipe of the Month – Calling All Deer Hunters

December 6, 2016

Marinated Venison Steak with Mushrooms

Ingredients:

  • 1 ½ pounds venison steak, trimmed of fat
  • 1 garlic clove, crushed
  • ½ teaspoon oregano
  • 1 cup fat-free Italian salad dressing
  • Black pepper
  • 1 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
  • Nonstick cooking spray

Directions:

The night before cooking, place steak in a gallon-size resealable plastic bag. Add crushed garlic clove, oregano, and salad dressing.  Shake well and refrigerate overnight.

Remove steak from bag and discard the marinade. Grill the steak indoors or outdoors, seasoning with black pepper to taste and turning once.  (For medium steak, internal temperature should be about 165 degrees  F. )

Top venison with mushrooms and serve.

Yield: 16 ounces cooked meat.  Serving size:  4 ounces or ¼ recipe.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving: Calories:  141, Carbohydrates:  5g, protein:  26g, Fat:  3 g, Saturated Fat:  1g, Cholesterol:  96 mg, Sodium 250 mg, Fiber:  2g

 

 

 

Source: Diabetes Self Management 2016

Diabetes Etiquette for Family and Friends

November 17, 2016

Last week our blog was about dealing with “Food Police”. This week we are focusing on diabetes etiquette for people who DON’T have diabetes –  well-meaning family members and friends of those with diabetes!

DON’T offer unsolicited advice about eating or other aspects of diabetes. You may mean well, but giving advice about someone’s personal habits, especially when it is not requested, isn’t very nice.  Besides, many of the popularly held beliefs about diabetes (“you should just stop eating sugar”) are out of date or just plain wrong.

DO realize and appreciate that diabetes is hard work. Diabetes management is a full-time job that wasn’t applied for, didn’t want, and can’t quit. It involves thinking about what, when, and how much is eaten, while factoring in exercise, medication, stress, blood sugar monitoring, and so much more – each and every day.

DON’T tell horror stories about your grandmother or other people with diabetes you have heard about. Diabetes is scary enough and stories like these are not reassuring! Besides, we now know that with good management, odds are good you can live a long, healthy, and happy life with diabetes.

DO offer to join your friend/loved on in making healthy lifestyle changes. Not having to be alone with efforts to change, like starting an exercise program, is one of the most powerful ways that you can be helpful. After all, healthy lifestyle changes can benefit everyone!

DON’T look so horrified when you see someone check their blood sugars or give themselves an injection. It is not fun for them. Checking blood sugar and taking medications are things they must do to manage diabetes well. If they have to hide while they do so, it makes it harder!

DO ask how you might be helpful. If you want to be supportive, there may be lots of little things that would be appreciated. However, what is needed most may be very different than what you think is needed, so please ask first.

DON’T offer thoughtless reassurances. When you first learn someone has diabetes, you may want to reassure them by saying things like, “Hey, it could be worse; you could have cancer!” This won’t make anyone feel better. And the implicit message seems to be that diabetes is no big deal. However, diabetes (like cancer) IS a big deal.

DO be supportive of self-care efforts. Help the person with diabetes set up an environment for success by supporting healthy food choices. Honor their decision to decline a particular food, even when you really want them to try it. You are most helpful when you are not being a source of unnecessary temptation.

DON’T peek or comment on glucose numbers without asking first! These numbers are private unless shared! It is normal to have numbers that are sometimes too low or too high. Your unsolicited comments about these numbers can add to the disappointment, frustration and anger being felt!

DO offer your love and encouragement. Sometimes just knowing that someone cares can be very helpful and motivating.

 

 

 

Resource: Behavioral Diabetes Institute

Handling the “Food Police”

November 10, 2016

Everyone manages their diabetes differently these days, including choices about food. Unfortunately, many well-intentioned people have outdated or incorrect information about how a person with diabetes is “supposed” to eat.  Hearing comments such as “should you be eating that?” can make people with diabetes feel frustrated, angry, isolated, and less likely to make diabetes-friendly choices.  Here are some tips for successfully navigating the challenges of the “food police”:

  1. Know when to speak up: Decide when it’s worth the hassle of responding to others who have commented on your eating or any other aspect of your diabetes management. Some factors to consider: your relationship with the person, how likely he or she is to change, and whether you want to spend your holiday time explaining your diabetes care.
  2. Choose your response: While you may want to tell the food police to mind their own business, choose a response that can help educate and keep the peace. An appropriate response will differ based on the person. For example, you might choose to educate your coworker about how modern diabetes management allows for occasional splurges. But you may decide to change the subject when faced with comments from your grandmother (while reminding yourself that she cares about you but has outdated knowledge and is unlikely to change).
  3. Be ready: Putting some forethought into what you would like to say can help things to smoother. What do you want people to know and what would you like them to do differently? For example, you might say, “I appreciate your concern for my health. You may not know that no foods are off limits for people with diabetes. I can have sweets for a special treat. I have planned ahead for this party, so you don’t need to worry!”

Holiday gatherings can cause the food police to come out in full force. Know when you would like to speak up and have a response ready.

 

Resource: Diabetes Forecast, Nov. 2016

 

 

 


Support Group Meeting November 17

November 4, 2016

The TalkDiabetes Support Program

and the Diabetes Education Program at St. Anthony’s present:

Get Ready for the Holidays:

Cooking Demonstration of

Green Beans with Tomato Basil Walnut Salsa

 

10 a.m. Thursday, November 17, 2016

Hyland Education Great Room

10020 Kennerly Road

St. Louis, MO 63128

 

Presented by:

Kristen Rider, BSN, RN, CDE

Darla Martin, RD, LD, CDE

And

Guest Speaker Chef James Woods

 

 

Meetings are FREE to the public.

All are welcome!

 To register, call 314-ANTHONY (268-4669)

or visit stanthonysmedcenter.com/diabetes.


Oh Those Aching Legs

September 27, 2016

by:  Susan Klick, MSN, RN, CNL

You are tired, you want to go to sleep, but your legs aren’t cooperating. You have an irresistible urge to move your legs, maybe even your thighs or your arms.  Or maybe you are at the movies, and your legs feel “jumpy”.  Long trips in the car, or a long-distance flight give you a throbbing, pulling, or creeping feeling in your legs.  This is Restless Leg Syndrome (RLS) and it can make bedtime or long car trips a nightmare.

Many times, RLS is confused or misdiagnosed as Peripheral Neuropathy. Diabetic neuropathy in particular is a nerve disorder caused by poor blood sugar control in people with diabetes.  The most common type of peripheral neuropathy results in problems with the feet.  Symptoms include numbness, pain, or tingling in the feet or lower legs and may be associated with difficulty in walking and weakness in foot muscles.

How do you know what you are dealing with? The most important questions to ask yourself are:  1) when does the pain occur and 2) does movement make the pain go away or feel better.  If the symptoms occur when you are lying down and trying to relax, in the evening, and movement makes the pain better, then you are most likely dealing with RLS.  RLS is sometimes seen in patients with kidney disease, Parkinson’s disease, people with low iron, pregnancy, and those taking antidepressants or antipsychotic drugs.  However, if you are experiencing numbness, tingling, and pricking sensations, sensitivity to touch, muscle weakness, burning pain that is not eased by walking (movement may even make the pain worse), and symptoms which do not change during particular times of the day –  you may be dealing with Peripheral Neuropathy.  What can make a diagnosis difficult is that the two can occur together.

By definition, RLS is a neurological disorder with symptoms occurring when lying down or trying to relax (primarily at night), and relief is found in moving the legs. Peripheral Neuropathy describes damage to the peripheral nervous system, which transmits information from the brain and spinal cord to every other part of the body.  It can be either inherited or acquired (as is the case with Diabetic neuropathy).

The key to managing peripheral neuropathy is to recognize the symptoms and work with your doctor to find the right treatment and approach that works for you.

  1. Keep your blood glucose levels in check. This can prevent or delay nerve damage or prevent further damage.
  2. Mild symptoms can be relieved with over the counter, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications.
  3. Medications to treat epilepsy, such as gabapentin and pregabalin, may help control more serious symptoms.
  4. Some physicians may recommend a tricyclic antidepressant, such as amitriptyline or doxepin, in a modest dose, to alleviate pain. Studies show that newer antidepressants may ease discomfort

If you have a distinct “creepy crawly” sensation, consult your doctor. Treatment for RLS may include having your blood checked for levels of vitamin D and iron.  Correcting deficiencies of each helps some people control symptoms.  Reducing the use of caffeine, alcohol, and tobacco can also make a difference.  The treatment of choice are drugs known as dopaminergics, which increase the body’s dopamine and have shown to alleviate moderate to severe RLS.

 

 

 

 

Source: Diabetes Living Fall 2015; Clinical Advisor March 2015; NIH.Gov

September Recipe of the Month

September 16, 2016

by Alison Brinker, RD, LD

Labor Day, the official last day of summer has come and gone, but don’t put the grill away yet! Late summer and early fall is a great time to be outside walking and cooking up a delicious and nutritious meal.  Grilling is a healthy preparation method for a low fat protein like white fish.  Enjoy!

Grilled Florida OJ Fish Tacos with Cilantro Slaw

Fish:

1-1/2 pounds Mahi-Mahi or other firm white fish

½ cup canola oil

1 cup Florida Orange Juice

1 teaspoon dried oregano

¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper

1 teaspoon finely minced garlic

Salt and pepper to taste

In a large bowl, whisk together oil, Florida Orange Juice, oregano, cayenne, garlic, salt and pepper. Reserve 1/3 cup of this mixture for the slaw.  Put fish in a zip top bag and pour the remaining marinade over the fish.  Seal bag and marinate at room temperature for 15 minutes.

Slaw:

¼ cup chopped cilantro

4 cups finely shredded cabbage

1 cup diced Florida Oranges or Florida Grapefruit

½ cup diced red onion

½ cup diced tomato

½ cup diced red bell pepper

1 small jalapeno, seeded and minced

 

Reserved 1/3 cup marinade (see above)

Salt and pepper to taste

In a large bowl, add reserved marinade, cilantro, cabbage, Florida Oranges or Florida Grapefruit, red onion, tomato, red bell pepper, jalapeno, salt and pepper. Toss well to coat and set aside to allow flavors to blend.

Tacos:

24 corn tortillas (6 inch size)

Fish and Slaw

Plain Greek yogurt for garnish (optional)

Heat a grill or grill pan to medium-high heat. Remove fish from marinade and discard marinade; grill about 5 minutes or just until done.  Do not overcook fish.  Remove fish from grill and flake with a fork.  Place tortillas on the grill for 20 seconds to heat them up.  For each taco, place about 1 ounce of fish into a tortilla and top with 1-2 tablespoons of slaw.  Garnish with Greek yogurt if desired.

Makes 12 servings: 2 tacos per serving

Estimated nutrition information per serving: 35 grams carbohydrate, 2 ounces protein/meat, 5 grams fat.

Source: Floridacitrus.org

 


August Recipes of the Month: Healthy Snack Ideas

August 23, 2016

Honey Mustard Snack Mix

Makes: 15 servings

Serving size: ½ cup

Ingredients

1-1/2 cups crispy corn and rice cereal

1 cup bite-size shredded wheat biscuits

¾ cup unblanched whole almonds

¼ cup peanuts

2 tablespoons butter

3 tablespoons honey mustard

1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce

¼ teaspoon garlic powder

1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper

4 cups plain popped popcorn

 

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 300 degrees. Line a 13x9x2 inch pan with foil, extending the foil over edges of pan. In the prepared pan toss together crispy cereal, wheat biscuits, almonds, and peanuts; set aside.
  2. In a small saucepan heat butter over medium heat until melted. Remove from heat.   Stir in mustard, Worcestershire sauce, garlic powder, and cayenne pepper. Drizzle mustard mixture over cereal mixture; toss gently to coat.
  3. Bake for 20 minutes, stirring gently after 10 minutes. Stir in popcorn. Using the edges of the foil, lift popcorn mixture out of pan; cool. Store in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 3 days. Makes 15 (1/2 cup) servings.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving: 113 calories, 8 g total fat (2 g sat fat), 4 mg cholesterol, 87 mg sodium, 9 g carb (2 g fiber, 1 g sugar), 3 g pro.

 

Sweet Party Mix

Makes:   36 servings

Serving size: 1/3 cup

Ingredients

Nonstick cooking spray

4 cups bite-size corn square cereal

3 cups bite-size rice square cereal

2 cups pretzel knots

2/3 cup sliced almonds

½ cup packed brown sugar

¼ cup butter

2 tablespoons light-colored corn syrup

1/8 teaspoon baking soda

¾ cup dried cranberries, blueberries, or cherries

 

Directions

  1. Lightly coat a large piece of foil with cooking spray; set aside. In a large roasting pan toss together corn cereal, rice cereal, pretzels, and almonds; set aside.
  2. In a medium saucepan combine brown sugar, butter, and corn syrup. Cook and stir over medium heat until mixture just begins to bubble. Continue cooking at a moderate, steady rate, without stirring, for 5 minutes more. Remove saucepan from heat; stir in baking soda. Pour over cereal mixture; stir gently to coat.
  3. Bake in a 300 degree oven for 15 minutes; stir cereal mixture and bake 5 minutes more. Remove from oven; stir in dried fruit. Spread on prepared foil to cool. Store in an airtight container. Makes 36 (1/3-cup) servings.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving: 31 calories, 50 mg sodium, 6 g carb (1g fiber), 1 g pro, estimated 3 g total fat.

Source: diabeticlivingonline.com

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