Diabetes Support Group Meets Thursday, May 18th

May 17, 2017

The TalkDiabetes Support Group is meeting Thursday, May 18th

at 6:30 in the Great Room at the Hyland Education and Training Center.

Have Questions?  Concerns?  What to learn more about your diabetes?

Bring your diabetes-related questions for an open discussion led by the

Diabetes Educators at St. Anthony’s Medical Center and

join our Diabetes Support Group Meeting!


Carbohydrate Counting Tips for the New Year

January 3, 2017

By Alison Brinker, RD, LD, CDE

Research shows that counting carbohydrates is important for good glucose control.   However, it can get a little tricky at times………pizza, salads, casseroles.  All those combination foods can be difficult.  Following are some tips that may help make counting your carbs a bit easier.

Hot dishes made with pasta or grains such as tuna noodle casserole or lasagna have about 30 grams of carbohydrate per cup. Using a measuring cup is most accurate, but if you can’t measure a cup is about the size of a woman’s fist.  Stews or Asian-style meals that are a mix of meat and vegetables in a savory sauce are about 15 grams of carb per cup.  Keep in mind that measuring foods at home will help you better estimate portion sizes when eating out.

Broth-based soups and cream soups made with water are about 15 grams of carb per cup. If it is a hearty soup you could eat with a fork or if it is loaded with noodles or beans estimate about 30 grams of carb for one cup.

If you are at a potluck think about the size of the serving spoon. Four level tablespoons is about ¼ cup.  This amount of baked beans, for example is about 15 grams of carbohydrate.  Baked beans are a starchy vegetable and most likely have molasses or brown sugar as an ingredient.  A larger serving spoon is about ¼ cup per scoop.  Two of these larger spoonfuls of corn or another starchy vegetable will be about a ½ cup or 15 grams of carb.

Not all salads are created equal when it comes to carbs. One cup of a leafy green salad has only 2-5 grams of carb compared to creamy coleslaw that has 15 grams carb for a ½ cup portion.  Potato salads and pasta salads often have sugar in the dressing so count those as 30 grams of carb for a ½ cup portion.

Think of pizza in terms of the crust. Thin crust is going to have much lower carb content than hand tossed or pan pizza.  1/8 of a 12 inch thin crust pizza has about 15 grams of carb.  You should add about 5-10 grams of carb per slice if you have a hand tossed crust or pan pizza.

Be careful with the items offered free to the table at some restaurants. Most rolls, bread slices and bread sticks are 15 grams of carb per serving.  Twelve tortilla chips are also about 15 grams of carb.  Even though the salsa is a free item and is very low in carbs, the chips can add up quickly.

Fruit smoothies, although they sound healthy, can have just as much carbohydrate as a can of regular soda. Some smoothies average 45 grams of carb in a 12 oz. portion which is just as much as a regular soda.  If you choose a smoothie as a quick breakfast option measure your ingredients separately as you add to the blender to ensure your carb count is accurate.

I hope you find these tips helpful. Below is a chicken chili recipe for the crockpot.  It is easy to prepare, great for a cold winter night and about 30 grams of carb for a 1 cup portion.  Carbohydrate is found in the white beans which are also a wonderful source of fiber.  Top your chili with diced avocado to add some healthy monounsaturated fat.  Enjoy!

 

Slow Cooker White Chili with Chicken

1 ½ pounds boneless, skinless chicken breast

1 Tablespoon minced garlic

1 Tablespoon ground cumin

1 teaspoon salt (optional)

1 teaspoon chili powder

½ teaspoon oregano

½ teaspoon cayenne pepper

½ pound dried Great Northern Beans

3 cups low sodium chicken broth

1 cup chopped onion

2 4-ounce cans chopped green chiles, undrained

Chopped fresh cilantro, chopped avocado, chopped tomato (optional for serving)

The evening before you plan to make the chili soak beans in a large container covered with water for at least 8 hours or overnight. Place beans along with chicken, onion, broth, chopped chiles and seasonings into the crockpot.  Stir to mix the ingredients.  Cook on high 4-6 hours or on low 8-10 hours.  Remove chicken from the crockpot and using 2 forks shred the chicken, return chicken to the crockpot and mix well.   Serve chili topped with cilantro, avocado and tomato if desired.

30 grams carbohydrate per 1 cup portion

 

Source: Diabeticlivingonline.com.  The recipe was modified using the White Chicken Chili on the Everyday Essential Great Northern Bean package and Slow Cooker White Chili with Chicken on allrecipes.com

 


12 Days of Diabetes

December 23, 2016

Here is a new twist to the traditional 12 Days of Christmas, a little something to make you smile!

On the 12th day of Christmas my Diabetes Educator gave to me:

12 Carbs a Counting

11 Injection Sites

10 Finger Pricks

9 Boxes of Lancets

8 Glucose Log Books

7 Containers of Test Strips

6 Glucose Tablets

5 Insulin Pens

4 Pen Needles

3 Ketone Strips

2 Healthy Feet

and Props for a Great A1C

Wishing you a very Merry Christmas and a Healthy New Year

Your Diabetes Care Team

Alison, Darla, Kristen, Liz, and Sue


Handling the “Food Police”

November 10, 2016

Everyone manages their diabetes differently these days, including choices about food. Unfortunately, many well-intentioned people have outdated or incorrect information about how a person with diabetes is “supposed” to eat.  Hearing comments such as “should you be eating that?” can make people with diabetes feel frustrated, angry, isolated, and less likely to make diabetes-friendly choices.  Here are some tips for successfully navigating the challenges of the “food police”:

  1. Know when to speak up: Decide when it’s worth the hassle of responding to others who have commented on your eating or any other aspect of your diabetes management. Some factors to consider: your relationship with the person, how likely he or she is to change, and whether you want to spend your holiday time explaining your diabetes care.
  2. Choose your response: While you may want to tell the food police to mind their own business, choose a response that can help educate and keep the peace. An appropriate response will differ based on the person. For example, you might choose to educate your coworker about how modern diabetes management allows for occasional splurges. But you may decide to change the subject when faced with comments from your grandmother (while reminding yourself that she cares about you but has outdated knowledge and is unlikely to change).
  3. Be ready: Putting some forethought into what you would like to say can help things to smoother. What do you want people to know and what would you like them to do differently? For example, you might say, “I appreciate your concern for my health. You may not know that no foods are off limits for people with diabetes. I can have sweets for a special treat. I have planned ahead for this party, so you don’t need to worry!”

Holiday gatherings can cause the food police to come out in full force. Know when you would like to speak up and have a response ready.

 

Resource: Diabetes Forecast, Nov. 2016

 

 

 


Support Group Meeting November 17

November 4, 2016

The TalkDiabetes Support Program

and the Diabetes Education Program at St. Anthony’s present:

Get Ready for the Holidays:

Cooking Demonstration of

Green Beans with Tomato Basil Walnut Salsa

 

10 a.m. Thursday, November 17, 2016

Hyland Education Great Room

10020 Kennerly Road

St. Louis, MO 63128

 

Presented by:

Kristen Rider, BSN, RN, CDE

Darla Martin, RD, LD, CDE

And

Guest Speaker Chef James Woods

 

 

Meetings are FREE to the public.

All are welcome!

 To register, call 314-ANTHONY (268-4669)

or visit stanthonysmedcenter.com/diabetes.


Heat and Humidity – What about those Test Strips???

July 5, 2016

By Susan Klick, MSN, RN, CNL

Summer Storage of Test Strips: Heat, humidity, temperature and exposure to air can all affect strips. Store test strips at a temperature less than 86 degrees F.  DO NOT FREEZE and DO NOT expose test strips to direct sunlight.

Other Good Test Strips Tips:

Loose diabetes test strips. If you put individual diabetes test strips into your purse or wallet this can affect the accuracy (unless they are foil-wrapped from the manufacturer). Also, try not to move the few remaining strips of one vial into the new vial you are opening if the code numbers don’t match. And if you have one vial of diabetes test strips at home and one vial at work but just use the one meter – make sure the vials have the same coding. WAIT!!! Ahhh. . . and one more thing. Even if the strips have the same code, they may have different expiration dates! After transferring a few strips a couple of times, you could end up with some pretty outdated strips floating around in a vial!

Age of blood sugar monitor: Old blood sugar monitors may be inaccurate simply because of age. But old diabetic meters also tend to need cleaning or the dirt/dried blood could affect the accuracy of the reading. Be sure to follow cleaning instructions from the manual to ensure accurate results. If you have a diabetic meter older than 5 years please consider calling the meter company (often there is a 1-800 # on the back of the meter) and asking for a free updated model. They should want to keep you as a customer buying their strips.

Expired diabetes test strips? Check the expiration date when the pharmacy gives you the diabetes test strips. If you don’t feel you’ll be using them before that date, ask for another batch with a later date

Underfilled? Most newer meters have under-fill detection of some sort, and some beep after a few seconds even if the chamber isn’t full.   You may get a reading lower than anticipated.   Some meters tend to “err” and waste strips if you don’t hold your finger in place long enough. It’s a good practice to hold your finger to the strip for 1-2 seconds after the beep to avoid wasting diabetes test strips because of under fill.

Date vial opened? For some diabetes test strips, once you open the vial you should use the content of the vial within 3 months no matter what the expiration date (because of repeated exposure to air). Some products have a lid with a preservative in it so they are supposedly good up until the actual expiration date on the bottle. However, other vials of strips are good for a limited time once the lid is opened (regardless of the date). Check the information in your diabetes test strip box to be sure.

Storage of meter: Don’t leave blood sugar monitors in the car on hot or freezing days. They are just tiny little devices and you know how temperamental electronics are.

Have a safe and healthy summer!

 

 

 

Source: American Diabetes Association

 


Need More Veggies?

May 10, 2016

By Darla Martin, RD, LD, CDE

 

Need help eating more veggies? Give this recipe a try! You could also add some stir fried chicken or tofu and serve over brown rice to make it a meal.

This Recipe Serves 3.   Serving Size 1 Cup.

Ingredients: 

1/4 cup fat-free, reduced-sodium chicken broth
2 tablespoons reduced-sodium soy sauce
stir fry veggies1/8 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
2 teaspoons canola oil
1 (12-ounce) bag carrots and broccoli florets
1 cup stringless sugar snap peas
1 teaspoon sesame seeds

 

Instructions:

  1. In a small bowl, whisk together the chicken broth, soy sauce, and red pepper flakes
  2. In a large nonstick skillet or wok, heat the oil over medium-high heat. Add the vegetables and cook for 5 minutes.
  3. Add the chicken broth mixture to the pan and bring to a simmer. Cook an additional 2 minutes. Sprinkle the stir-fry with sesame seeds and serve.

Nutritional Facts: Calories 95; Carbohydrates 13g; Protein 5g; Fat 4g; Saturated Fat 0.4g; Sugar 4g; Fiber 4g; Cholesterol 0mg; Sodium 465mg; Potassium 445mg.

 

 

 

Source: diabetes.org


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