Taking Control of Your Diabetes Conference

June 22, 2017

We wanted to let you know about a fantastic conference called Taking Control of Your Diabetes that’s coming to the Cervantes Convention Center at America’s Center on Saturday, September 23, 2017.  We recommend this day-long conference to all patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes because it is a great place for you to learn about all the latest diabetes developments, research, technology, and medications – all in one place.  So many conferences like this tend to be boring and not very fun or exciting, but TCOYD puts an emphasis on humor, motivating workshops, empowering educational lectures, health screenings, an interactive health fair with dozens of exhibitors, and much more.  Lunch is included as well in this all-day conference.  If you’re looking for that extra bit of inspiration to help you better manage your diabetes, attend this conference!

Cost is only $30 per person if you register before September 20, after which the price goes up to $45.  Financial assistance is available by contacting TCOYD directly.

 

To register or learn more visit the following website:

http://www.tcoyd.org/2017stlouis

 

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The Daily Grind: Caffeine Consumption

April 5, 2017

by:  Emily Nice, RD, LD

April showers bring… slow-moving hours! Rainy days and dreary Mondays tend to hit pretty hard at times, especially if you miss out on your morning cup of coffee. Sometimes, we really need that extra boost caffeine can provide, but how much is too much?

The 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend consuming less than 400mg of caffeine daily. Average American caffeine consumption remains within this recommendation; however, it is important to note that these guidelines are reflective of adults without any serious medical conditions which may require more restrictive intakes. Approximately 95% of American adults consume caffeine, mostly coming from coffee and tea intake. The American Heart Association recommends keeping coffee intake at or below 1-2 cups daily. The amount of caffeine in a cup of coffee varies between different brands/styles, and just one 8 ounce cup of coffee may contain approximately 95-200mg of caffeine.

Depending on how you take your coffee or tea, you may be adding more empty calories to your diet than you realize as well. Additives are often unaccounted for or missed when recounting what has been consumed for the day. It is also common to pair these beverages with high calorie pastries and snacks, which may contain large amounts of both sugar and fat. These habits could negatively impact your blood sugar control and/or your efforts to lose weight.

After a long day, a warm caffeinated beverage may provide a comforting pick-me-up, but this may also influence poor sleep if consumed before bed or too late in the day. Restlessness or poor quality sleep may lead to higher blood glucose levels, making a good night’s sleep especially important in controlling your blood sugar. Pay attention to your body and make sleep a priority.

Caffeinated beverages and foods can fit into a well-balanced diet if consumed in moderation. If your daily caffeine intake is reaching or exceeding the limit, you may want to cut back. Make sure to watch your portion sizes and be sure to account for any added cream or sugar you may be enjoying. Pay attention to the types of food you choose to accommodate your drink, and be careful not to indulge too late in the day to allow time for good quality sleep at night.

From a little morning inspiration to a quick pick-me-up in the early afternoon, a reasonable caffeine fix can fit into a healthy lifestyle.

 

 

 

 

 

Resources:
2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans
American Heart Association – August 2015
Food & Nutrition – March 2017
Diabetes Forecast – July 2016

Diabetes, Websites, Apps Oh My!

February 28, 2017

If you missed our February 16th Support Group, don’t worry!  Here is a list of our recommended applications for your mobile devices and websites to help track your diabetes:

BG Monitor Diabetes: Allows you to track everything, calculate how much insulin you need, set reminders, create spreadsheets and graph your data. Organize your entries with tags.  Create a photo log of meals.

My Fitness Pal: Track food intake, exercise and weight. At the end of each day you are given an overall nutritional snapshot of your eating and an estimate of how long it will take to reach your weight loss goal based on current eating habits.  You can also log activity from an extensive list of exercises and the app will calculate calories burned.  You can also input numbers from a heart rate monitor from your treadmill for example of some other fitness tracker.

Calorie Counter PRO: This is a weight loss app that can help track your daily eating and can be useful when managing your diabetes. It allows you to chart your progress and take daily notes without being overwhelming.  It also tracks body measurements.

Glucose Buddy: Tracks food, insulin, blood sugar results and will show a graph of your glucose results. You can set an alert to remind you to check your blood glucose throughout the day.

Lose it: Used for weight management. Create a profile and use the apps recommended amount of calories for weight loss or input your own.  It has a large food database.  Input custom foods, scan bar codes or it will suggest foods based on a photo of your meal or snack.

MySugr: Track everything in one place, meals to mood. Create monthly reports.  This app does offer advanced services for a fee.

Fooducate: Offers good community support, has a scanner that gives groceries a grade. Good choice if feeling overwhelmed at the grocery store.

Diabetes Goal Tracker: This app was developed by the American Association of Diabetes Educators. Set goals to manage diabetes based on the 7 self-care behaviors we use when tracking our program participants.  Set goals for yourself and the app will send you reminders to help keep you on track and give inspiration.  The My Nutrition section allows you to scan bar codes of foods or enter foods and track calories, carbs, fat and sodium.

Diabetes.org: This is the main website for the American Diabetes Association. Under the Food and Fitness tab you will find tips for eating out, planning meals, and carbohydrate information.  Under this tab is also a link to My Food Advisor where you can find nutrition information about various foods and even create a database of your own recipes.  You will need to create an account, but it is free.

Diabetesselfmanagement.com: This site was created by the providers of Diabetes Self -Management magazine. Good resource for recipes and general information about caring for diabetes.

Nutritiondata.com: Create your own food database; use the website to analyze nutrition content of your favorite recipes

 


Diabetes Support Program Presents:

February 7, 2017

Diabetes, Apps, and Websites – Oh My!

10:00 a.m.  Thursday, February 16, 2017

Hyland Education Great Room

10020 Kennerly Road

St. Louis, MO 63128

 

Presented by:

Alison Brinker, RD, LD, CDE

Susan Klick, MSN, RN CNL

Meetings are FREE to the public.

All are welcome!

 To register, call 314-ANTHONY (268-4669)

or visit stanthonysmedcenter.com/diabetes.

Come and join us for a fun and learn about the latest mobile phone apps and websites designed to help manage your diabetes better.

 


Holiday Table – Green Beans with Tomato Basil Walnut Salsa

December 13, 2016

Enjoy this delicious vegetable side dish as part of your holiday meal. 

Ingredients:

2 ¼ pound                Green Beans, fresh

2/3 tbsp.                   Olive or canola oil

2 tbsp.                       Garlic Cloves, peeled, fresh, minced

½ Cup                       Basil, Fresh, Chopped

2 tbsp.                       Shallots, peeled, fresh, minced

12 ounce                  Tomatoes, fresh, peeled, diced

4 tbsp.                       Olives, Kalamata, pitted, chopped

1 tbsp.                       Walnuts, chopped

4 tbsp.                       Red wine vinegar

 

Preparation:

 

  1. Blanch green beans in boiling water, drain, chill and drain. Place on a platter.
  2. Heat oil in a skillet and cook garlic until toasted to a golden brown.
  3. Place toasted garlic in a bowl. Add basil, shallots, diced tomatoes, finely minced olives, finely minced toasted walnuts and red wine vinegar. Mix together.
  4. Arrange garlic mixture over green beans.  

Nutrition Information per 1 cup serving: 55 calories, 2 g total fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 47 mg sodium, 9 g carbohydrate (3 g fiber, 4 g sugars), 2 g protein

green-beans

 

 

Resource:   2011  Morrison Management Specialists, Inc

December Recipe of the Month – Calling All Deer Hunters

December 6, 2016

Marinated Venison Steak with Mushrooms

Ingredients:

  • 1 ½ pounds venison steak, trimmed of fat
  • 1 garlic clove, crushed
  • ½ teaspoon oregano
  • 1 cup fat-free Italian salad dressing
  • Black pepper
  • 1 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
  • Nonstick cooking spray

Directions:

The night before cooking, place steak in a gallon-size resealable plastic bag. Add crushed garlic clove, oregano, and salad dressing.  Shake well and refrigerate overnight.

Remove steak from bag and discard the marinade. Grill the steak indoors or outdoors, seasoning with black pepper to taste and turning once.  (For medium steak, internal temperature should be about 165 degrees  F. )

Top venison with mushrooms and serve.

Yield: 16 ounces cooked meat.  Serving size:  4 ounces or ¼ recipe.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving: Calories:  141, Carbohydrates:  5g, protein:  26g, Fat:  3 g, Saturated Fat:  1g, Cholesterol:  96 mg, Sodium 250 mg, Fiber:  2g

 

 

 

Source: Diabetes Self Management 2016

Diabetes Etiquette for Family and Friends

November 17, 2016

Last week our blog was about dealing with “Food Police”. This week we are focusing on diabetes etiquette for people who DON’T have diabetes –  well-meaning family members and friends of those with diabetes!

DON’T offer unsolicited advice about eating or other aspects of diabetes. You may mean well, but giving advice about someone’s personal habits, especially when it is not requested, isn’t very nice.  Besides, many of the popularly held beliefs about diabetes (“you should just stop eating sugar”) are out of date or just plain wrong.

DO realize and appreciate that diabetes is hard work. Diabetes management is a full-time job that wasn’t applied for, didn’t want, and can’t quit. It involves thinking about what, when, and how much is eaten, while factoring in exercise, medication, stress, blood sugar monitoring, and so much more – each and every day.

DON’T tell horror stories about your grandmother or other people with diabetes you have heard about. Diabetes is scary enough and stories like these are not reassuring! Besides, we now know that with good management, odds are good you can live a long, healthy, and happy life with diabetes.

DO offer to join your friend/loved on in making healthy lifestyle changes. Not having to be alone with efforts to change, like starting an exercise program, is one of the most powerful ways that you can be helpful. After all, healthy lifestyle changes can benefit everyone!

DON’T look so horrified when you see someone check their blood sugars or give themselves an injection. It is not fun for them. Checking blood sugar and taking medications are things they must do to manage diabetes well. If they have to hide while they do so, it makes it harder!

DO ask how you might be helpful. If you want to be supportive, there may be lots of little things that would be appreciated. However, what is needed most may be very different than what you think is needed, so please ask first.

DON’T offer thoughtless reassurances. When you first learn someone has diabetes, you may want to reassure them by saying things like, “Hey, it could be worse; you could have cancer!” This won’t make anyone feel better. And the implicit message seems to be that diabetes is no big deal. However, diabetes (like cancer) IS a big deal.

DO be supportive of self-care efforts. Help the person with diabetes set up an environment for success by supporting healthy food choices. Honor their decision to decline a particular food, even when you really want them to try it. You are most helpful when you are not being a source of unnecessary temptation.

DON’T peek or comment on glucose numbers without asking first! These numbers are private unless shared! It is normal to have numbers that are sometimes too low or too high. Your unsolicited comments about these numbers can add to the disappointment, frustration and anger being felt!

DO offer your love and encouragement. Sometimes just knowing that someone cares can be very helpful and motivating.

 

 

 

Resource: Behavioral Diabetes Institute

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