The Daily Grind: Caffeine Consumption

April 5, 2017

by:  Emily Nice, RD, LD

April showers bring… slow-moving hours! Rainy days and dreary Mondays tend to hit pretty hard at times, especially if you miss out on your morning cup of coffee. Sometimes, we really need that extra boost caffeine can provide, but how much is too much?

The 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend consuming less than 400mg of caffeine daily. Average American caffeine consumption remains within this recommendation; however, it is important to note that these guidelines are reflective of adults without any serious medical conditions which may require more restrictive intakes. Approximately 95% of American adults consume caffeine, mostly coming from coffee and tea intake. The American Heart Association recommends keeping coffee intake at or below 1-2 cups daily. The amount of caffeine in a cup of coffee varies between different brands/styles, and just one 8 ounce cup of coffee may contain approximately 95-200mg of caffeine.

Depending on how you take your coffee or tea, you may be adding more empty calories to your diet than you realize as well. Additives are often unaccounted for or missed when recounting what has been consumed for the day. It is also common to pair these beverages with high calorie pastries and snacks, which may contain large amounts of both sugar and fat. These habits could negatively impact your blood sugar control and/or your efforts to lose weight.

After a long day, a warm caffeinated beverage may provide a comforting pick-me-up, but this may also influence poor sleep if consumed before bed or too late in the day. Restlessness or poor quality sleep may lead to higher blood glucose levels, making a good night’s sleep especially important in controlling your blood sugar. Pay attention to your body and make sleep a priority.

Caffeinated beverages and foods can fit into a well-balanced diet if consumed in moderation. If your daily caffeine intake is reaching or exceeding the limit, you may want to cut back. Make sure to watch your portion sizes and be sure to account for any added cream or sugar you may be enjoying. Pay attention to the types of food you choose to accommodate your drink, and be careful not to indulge too late in the day to allow time for good quality sleep at night.

From a little morning inspiration to a quick pick-me-up in the early afternoon, a reasonable caffeine fix can fit into a healthy lifestyle.

 

 

 

 

 

Resources:
2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans
American Heart Association – August 2015
Food & Nutrition – March 2017
Diabetes Forecast – July 2016

Carbohydrate Counting Tips for the New Year

January 3, 2017

By Alison Brinker, RD, LD, CDE

Research shows that counting carbohydrates is important for good glucose control.   However, it can get a little tricky at times………pizza, salads, casseroles.  All those combination foods can be difficult.  Following are some tips that may help make counting your carbs a bit easier.

Hot dishes made with pasta or grains such as tuna noodle casserole or lasagna have about 30 grams of carbohydrate per cup. Using a measuring cup is most accurate, but if you can’t measure a cup is about the size of a woman’s fist.  Stews or Asian-style meals that are a mix of meat and vegetables in a savory sauce are about 15 grams of carb per cup.  Keep in mind that measuring foods at home will help you better estimate portion sizes when eating out.

Broth-based soups and cream soups made with water are about 15 grams of carb per cup. If it is a hearty soup you could eat with a fork or if it is loaded with noodles or beans estimate about 30 grams of carb for one cup.

If you are at a potluck think about the size of the serving spoon. Four level tablespoons is about ¼ cup.  This amount of baked beans, for example is about 15 grams of carbohydrate.  Baked beans are a starchy vegetable and most likely have molasses or brown sugar as an ingredient.  A larger serving spoon is about ¼ cup per scoop.  Two of these larger spoonfuls of corn or another starchy vegetable will be about a ½ cup or 15 grams of carb.

Not all salads are created equal when it comes to carbs. One cup of a leafy green salad has only 2-5 grams of carb compared to creamy coleslaw that has 15 grams carb for a ½ cup portion.  Potato salads and pasta salads often have sugar in the dressing so count those as 30 grams of carb for a ½ cup portion.

Think of pizza in terms of the crust. Thin crust is going to have much lower carb content than hand tossed or pan pizza.  1/8 of a 12 inch thin crust pizza has about 15 grams of carb.  You should add about 5-10 grams of carb per slice if you have a hand tossed crust or pan pizza.

Be careful with the items offered free to the table at some restaurants. Most rolls, bread slices and bread sticks are 15 grams of carb per serving.  Twelve tortilla chips are also about 15 grams of carb.  Even though the salsa is a free item and is very low in carbs, the chips can add up quickly.

Fruit smoothies, although they sound healthy, can have just as much carbohydrate as a can of regular soda. Some smoothies average 45 grams of carb in a 12 oz. portion which is just as much as a regular soda.  If you choose a smoothie as a quick breakfast option measure your ingredients separately as you add to the blender to ensure your carb count is accurate.

I hope you find these tips helpful. Below is a chicken chili recipe for the crockpot.  It is easy to prepare, great for a cold winter night and about 30 grams of carb for a 1 cup portion.  Carbohydrate is found in the white beans which are also a wonderful source of fiber.  Top your chili with diced avocado to add some healthy monounsaturated fat.  Enjoy!

 

Slow Cooker White Chili with Chicken

1 ½ pounds boneless, skinless chicken breast

1 Tablespoon minced garlic

1 Tablespoon ground cumin

1 teaspoon salt (optional)

1 teaspoon chili powder

½ teaspoon oregano

½ teaspoon cayenne pepper

½ pound dried Great Northern Beans

3 cups low sodium chicken broth

1 cup chopped onion

2 4-ounce cans chopped green chiles, undrained

Chopped fresh cilantro, chopped avocado, chopped tomato (optional for serving)

The evening before you plan to make the chili soak beans in a large container covered with water for at least 8 hours or overnight. Place beans along with chicken, onion, broth, chopped chiles and seasonings into the crockpot.  Stir to mix the ingredients.  Cook on high 4-6 hours or on low 8-10 hours.  Remove chicken from the crockpot and using 2 forks shred the chicken, return chicken to the crockpot and mix well.   Serve chili topped with cilantro, avocado and tomato if desired.

30 grams carbohydrate per 1 cup portion

 

Source: Diabeticlivingonline.com.  The recipe was modified using the White Chicken Chili on the Everyday Essential Great Northern Bean package and Slow Cooker White Chili with Chicken on allrecipes.com

 


Holiday Table – Green Beans with Tomato Basil Walnut Salsa

December 13, 2016

Enjoy this delicious vegetable side dish as part of your holiday meal. 

Ingredients:

2 ¼ pound                Green Beans, fresh

2/3 tbsp.                   Olive or canola oil

2 tbsp.                       Garlic Cloves, peeled, fresh, minced

½ Cup                       Basil, Fresh, Chopped

2 tbsp.                       Shallots, peeled, fresh, minced

12 ounce                  Tomatoes, fresh, peeled, diced

4 tbsp.                       Olives, Kalamata, pitted, chopped

1 tbsp.                       Walnuts, chopped

4 tbsp.                       Red wine vinegar

 

Preparation:

 

  1. Blanch green beans in boiling water, drain, chill and drain. Place on a platter.
  2. Heat oil in a skillet and cook garlic until toasted to a golden brown.
  3. Place toasted garlic in a bowl. Add basil, shallots, diced tomatoes, finely minced olives, finely minced toasted walnuts and red wine vinegar. Mix together.
  4. Arrange garlic mixture over green beans.  

Nutrition Information per 1 cup serving: 55 calories, 2 g total fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 47 mg sodium, 9 g carbohydrate (3 g fiber, 4 g sugars), 2 g protein

green-beans

 

 

Resource:   2011  Morrison Management Specialists, Inc

December Recipe of the Month – Calling All Deer Hunters

December 6, 2016

Marinated Venison Steak with Mushrooms

Ingredients:

  • 1 ½ pounds venison steak, trimmed of fat
  • 1 garlic clove, crushed
  • ½ teaspoon oregano
  • 1 cup fat-free Italian salad dressing
  • Black pepper
  • 1 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
  • Nonstick cooking spray

Directions:

The night before cooking, place steak in a gallon-size resealable plastic bag. Add crushed garlic clove, oregano, and salad dressing.  Shake well and refrigerate overnight.

Remove steak from bag and discard the marinade. Grill the steak indoors or outdoors, seasoning with black pepper to taste and turning once.  (For medium steak, internal temperature should be about 165 degrees  F. )

Top venison with mushrooms and serve.

Yield: 16 ounces cooked meat.  Serving size:  4 ounces or ¼ recipe.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving: Calories:  141, Carbohydrates:  5g, protein:  26g, Fat:  3 g, Saturated Fat:  1g, Cholesterol:  96 mg, Sodium 250 mg, Fiber:  2g

 

 

 

Source: Diabetes Self Management 2016

Handling the “Food Police”

November 10, 2016

Everyone manages their diabetes differently these days, including choices about food. Unfortunately, many well-intentioned people have outdated or incorrect information about how a person with diabetes is “supposed” to eat.  Hearing comments such as “should you be eating that?” can make people with diabetes feel frustrated, angry, isolated, and less likely to make diabetes-friendly choices.  Here are some tips for successfully navigating the challenges of the “food police”:

  1. Know when to speak up: Decide when it’s worth the hassle of responding to others who have commented on your eating or any other aspect of your diabetes management. Some factors to consider: your relationship with the person, how likely he or she is to change, and whether you want to spend your holiday time explaining your diabetes care.
  2. Choose your response: While you may want to tell the food police to mind their own business, choose a response that can help educate and keep the peace. An appropriate response will differ based on the person. For example, you might choose to educate your coworker about how modern diabetes management allows for occasional splurges. But you may decide to change the subject when faced with comments from your grandmother (while reminding yourself that she cares about you but has outdated knowledge and is unlikely to change).
  3. Be ready: Putting some forethought into what you would like to say can help things to smoother. What do you want people to know and what would you like them to do differently? For example, you might say, “I appreciate your concern for my health. You may not know that no foods are off limits for people with diabetes. I can have sweets for a special treat. I have planned ahead for this party, so you don’t need to worry!”

Holiday gatherings can cause the food police to come out in full force. Know when you would like to speak up and have a response ready.

 

Resource: Diabetes Forecast, Nov. 2016

 

 

 


Support Group Meeting November 17

November 4, 2016

The TalkDiabetes Support Program

and the Diabetes Education Program at St. Anthony’s present:

Get Ready for the Holidays:

Cooking Demonstration of

Green Beans with Tomato Basil Walnut Salsa

 

10 a.m. Thursday, November 17, 2016

Hyland Education Great Room

10020 Kennerly Road

St. Louis, MO 63128

 

Presented by:

Kristen Rider, BSN, RN, CDE

Darla Martin, RD, LD, CDE

And

Guest Speaker Chef James Woods

 

 

Meetings are FREE to the public.

All are welcome!

 To register, call 314-ANTHONY (268-4669)

or visit stanthonysmedcenter.com/diabetes.


August Recipes of the Month: Healthy Snack Ideas

August 23, 2016

Honey Mustard Snack Mix

Makes: 15 servings

Serving size: ½ cup

Ingredients

1-1/2 cups crispy corn and rice cereal

1 cup bite-size shredded wheat biscuits

¾ cup unblanched whole almonds

¼ cup peanuts

2 tablespoons butter

3 tablespoons honey mustard

1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce

¼ teaspoon garlic powder

1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper

4 cups plain popped popcorn

 

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 300 degrees. Line a 13x9x2 inch pan with foil, extending the foil over edges of pan. In the prepared pan toss together crispy cereal, wheat biscuits, almonds, and peanuts; set aside.
  2. In a small saucepan heat butter over medium heat until melted. Remove from heat.   Stir in mustard, Worcestershire sauce, garlic powder, and cayenne pepper. Drizzle mustard mixture over cereal mixture; toss gently to coat.
  3. Bake for 20 minutes, stirring gently after 10 minutes. Stir in popcorn. Using the edges of the foil, lift popcorn mixture out of pan; cool. Store in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 3 days. Makes 15 (1/2 cup) servings.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving: 113 calories, 8 g total fat (2 g sat fat), 4 mg cholesterol, 87 mg sodium, 9 g carb (2 g fiber, 1 g sugar), 3 g pro.

 

Sweet Party Mix

Makes:   36 servings

Serving size: 1/3 cup

Ingredients

Nonstick cooking spray

4 cups bite-size corn square cereal

3 cups bite-size rice square cereal

2 cups pretzel knots

2/3 cup sliced almonds

½ cup packed brown sugar

¼ cup butter

2 tablespoons light-colored corn syrup

1/8 teaspoon baking soda

¾ cup dried cranberries, blueberries, or cherries

 

Directions

  1. Lightly coat a large piece of foil with cooking spray; set aside. In a large roasting pan toss together corn cereal, rice cereal, pretzels, and almonds; set aside.
  2. In a medium saucepan combine brown sugar, butter, and corn syrup. Cook and stir over medium heat until mixture just begins to bubble. Continue cooking at a moderate, steady rate, without stirring, for 5 minutes more. Remove saucepan from heat; stir in baking soda. Pour over cereal mixture; stir gently to coat.
  3. Bake in a 300 degree oven for 15 minutes; stir cereal mixture and bake 5 minutes more. Remove from oven; stir in dried fruit. Spread on prepared foil to cool. Store in an airtight container. Makes 36 (1/3-cup) servings.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving: 31 calories, 50 mg sodium, 6 g carb (1g fiber), 1 g pro, estimated 3 g total fat.

Source: diabeticlivingonline.com

%d bloggers like this: